One of the challenges seasoned change leaders have is entering a new environment and still being respected as a leader. This can come as a result of a re-organization, a job change, or life as usual for consultants (we’re always the new kid on the block). The first thing any new person to a team must do is LISTEN. But the new kid will hear a lot of noise, so below are the critical factors you should listen for when entering a new environment BEFORE you lead:

  1. To hear the status quo  – One thing most change leaders don’t like to hear is “we’ve always done it this way”. But that piece of intel can unlock methods and  motives behind the way things are currently operating. Don’t be so quick to dismiss this information, it can save you from re-inventing the wheel, and it will let your team know that you’ve done some homework. You can later use the information as a baseline for your strategy of where you’re going next.
  2. To understand the relationship dynamics – To lead change in an organization of any size, you need to gather your allies, and size up your challengers. Listening attentively for relational disharmony can keep you from stepping on a landmine. Also, when you pay attention to the behavior styles of the team, you’ll be better equipped to help them move their cheese.Everyone on a team has a part to play, but they may not all know their role. Listen carefully for signs of role ambiguity (people and/or team members not knowing their roles).
  3. To hear the REAL problem  – Often the people or processes you are trying to change aren’t what really need to change. When embarking on a new initiative, you have to look and listen for the real issue. This requires crafting questions that help get to the root of things. Ask “why?” multiple times (I like the rule of thumb to ask it at least 3 times). The goal is to probe and listen so you can hear past the symptoms and deal with the root cause.

THEN (and only then) can you objectively create a change strategy. This Listening Assessment is useful for implementing new business processes, or even for getting a teenager to improve their performance in Algebra. Whatever the change you’re spearheading, be sure to Listen…Then Lead!